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NASA GLOBE Observer’s Weekly Roundup: 9- 15 Dec. 2018


A man uses his phone to take a picture of a mountain.

The AGU Fall meeting is this week. This, mountains, apps and more in this week's edition of the roundup.

1. AGU: GLOBE Observer and The GLOBE Program have a number of posters and presentations at this year's AGU meeting.  Everything from the eclipse to mitigating zika through using the GLOBE Observer app. Check out the full listing in the second link below.

2. MOUNTAINS: This coming Tuesday (December 11) is International Mountain Day.

"Mountains cover around 22 percent of the Earth's land surface and are home to 13 percent of the world’s population."

Mountains offer several types of land cover.  Why not make land cover observations at a mountain near you this week

3. APPS: Tuesday is also National App Day. Apps provide a lot of services to users. Everything from monitoring your health and the amount of steps you took, to traffic, baby development, and more.  Hand-held digital science and data collection was not possible in the past. However, as you are well aware, NASA GLOBE Observer provides to the citizen scientist opportunities to observe the world around them and record their findings through the use of an app.  By using the GLOBE Observer app you are also providing a service to people you may never meet.  Your scientific findings and efforts are important -- keep it up.

4. CRYOSPHERE: For the last few weeks NASA Earth Science has been releasing videos all about the icy parts of our Earth. Glaciers, permafrost, you name it.  Check out the links below for a couple of the videos.

Also, here is a resource that you can use with the kids in your life: The latest issue of EO Kids discusses one of these icy land cover type: glaciers -- see the third link in the below.

5. WEEKLY VIDEO: And last but not least check out our favorite cloud images from all around the world. 

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Did you Know?

Cirrus over Cumulus

This is a great, and fairly typical shot of high thin cirrus over low cumulus clouds in the Tropics.

Photo taken by Doug Stoddard in Puerto Rico.