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NASA GLOBE Observer’s Weekly Roundup: Citizen Science Day -- Special Edition


Citizen scientist taking pictures of the sky out doors.

Celebrate #CitSciDay2018 with us all this week and learn about a few other citizen science projects that you can do with NASA.  This and more in this week's edition of the roundup.  

1. CITIZEN SCIENCE: The Citizen Science Association, SciStarter, and the Citizen Science Day Working Group are excited to present Citizen Science Day on Saturday April 14th, 2018! 2018 marks the third annual Citizen Science Day celebration. 

"Citizen Science Day celebrates the work of citizen scientists and the diversity of citizen science projects across the world, encourages the public to get involved, and connects people to the power of citizen science."

NASA GLOBE Observer is pleased to participate in this celebration.  Check out our Facebook and Twitter pages all this week for special highlights on eight different citizen science projects that you can get involved in with NASA.  Plus, check out the NASA Snapchat, Instagram and Facebook Stories throughout the day on Thursday, April 12th for some special content highlighting the eight projects listed further below.

Be sure to also visit the fourth link in the below to meet some special citizen scientists and the work they do around the world.

2. GLOBE OBSERVER: If you are reading this blog then most likely you are already familiar with NASA GLOBE Observer (or as we like to say, NASA GO), but here is a little bit more about it.

GLOBE Observer is an international network of citizen scientists and scientists working together to learn more about our shared environment. To participate, just download the GLOBE Observer app and submit regular observations. We are currently accepting observations of clouds and mosquito habitats.  And just as a reminder: There are still a few more days left in our cloud challenge, so get those observations in by submitting your pictures of clouds through the app. Need more instructions? Click here, or check out the second link below.

3. LANDSLIDE REPORTER: "NASA scientists are building a catalog of landslides so we can be prepared when the next disasters will occur. You can help influence decisions that could save lives and property today by joining Landslide Reporter as a citizen scientist."

4. JUNOCAM: By joining the JunoCam community you can browse other users' processed images from JunoCam or download, process, and submit your own images. Plus, upload telescopic images of Jupiter and more.

5. PLANET FOUR: RIDGES: "Planet Four: Ridges needs your help to map where polgyonal ridges occur on Mars. By joining you will be looking for networks of ridges that intersect to making a polygonal, spider-web-like pattern. The images you can analyze are from the Context Camera orbiting Mars. Additionally the locations you identify will serve as likely future targets for higher resolution observations."

6. AURORASAURUS: New type of dinosaur? No, this citizen science project lets all report on aurora by mapping where you see them on Earth

7. DISK DETECTIVE:  "Disk Detective needs your help to discover the birthplace of planets in never-before seen data!"

8. EXOPLANET EXPLORERS: Exoplanet Explorers is hosted on Zooniverse, an online platform for crowd sourcing research.

"People anywhere can log on and learn what real signals from exoplanets look like, and then look through actual data collected from the Kepler telescope to vote on whether or not to classify a given signal as a transit, or just noise. We have each potential transit signal looked at by a minimum of 10 people, and each needs a minimum of 90 percent of 'yes' votes to be considered for further characterization." -- Jessie Christiansen, Caltech Staff Scientist

9. BACKYARD WORLDS: "Is there a large planet at the fringes of our solar system awaiting discovery? At Backyardworlds.org, you can help NASA search for this planet and for new brown dwarfs in the backyard of the solar system."

10. WEEKLY VIDEO: We still want to share this week's favorite cloud observation submissions from citizen scientists from around the world.

EXTRA: Get information on even more citizen science projects with NASA in the first link below.  Also, check out Sci Starter for additional projects you can participate in as a citizen scientist.

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Did you Know?

Cirrus over Cumulus

This is a great, and fairly typical shot of high thin cirrus over low cumulus clouds in the Tropics.

Photo taken by Doug Stoddard in Puerto Rico.